Thread: Dave's Triumph...

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  1. #11  
    Little Brit
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26
    After examining the 3.90 rear axle, the welding was coming apart and creating the risk of the rear axle locking.

    My friend Todd, who has been helping me throughout the process of getting back into and repairing the TR-8, supplied me with a 3.45 rear with around 28,000 miles on it.

    We spent the morning stripping and prepping it. It took about two hours but I brushed on new paint and now it looks just like new



    While we were at it, I prepped and painted the oil pan. need a few odds and ends but the engine should be dropped back in shortly.

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  2. #12  
    Young Brit
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    94
    On my TR8, a previous own had put in a 3.90 (I assume the original had failed).

    I replaced it with a 3.45, and I am very happy with it now.

    Good luck,
    Rob
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  3. #13  
    David,

    You mention roller rockers on this motor, a former customer owned the car and was a good friend of mine and did all his own work. Old Hot Rod guy. He may have put roller rockers on it but they were never purchased from The Wedge Shop.

    If you have seen ours you would know, very different and ours are Custom done to our Spec's from T&D and then we make out own stantions from Billet Aluminum. In Fact I never once worked on this car, as I said Ken Loved to do his own work. He did purchase a New 4.0 short block for that car from me.

    Thanks
    Woody
    The Wedge Shop
    The Wedge Shop
    Fast.British.Reliable.
    www.thewedgeshop.com
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  4. #14  
    Little Brit
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26
    Thanks Woody,

    I researched a bit and found that they are T&D roller rockers, without the important modifications that you guys add to the package. They were also installed incorrectly so that the holes in the threading were not lining up and oil was not flowing through correctly. This was one of several issues that led to premature wear, so we pulled everything apart and the engine guy fixed the issues. The missing shims were added to the roller rockers and everything was adjusted properly so it should now be good to go. Those rockers were real expensive so I resisted going back to a stock set. Based on what you stated it looks like he bought a lot of upgrades from either the wedge shop or other sources and like you said had it assembled elsewhere. Just clearing up the kinks and getting it ready for April.

    Looking forward to 1-2 car shows like old times or whatever my wife will tolerate
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  5. #15  
    Little Brit
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26
    A few weekends in March were devoted to putting the engine back together. After some debating I stuck with the Buick timing cover. Adjustments were made to get the balancer from being a Buick one to the Rover one. Just another one of those things that could have contributed to premature wear.



    Sticking with the Buick cover made it easier to add the aftermarket components. My buddy was able to get the belts lined up with some measure of creativity, as the Rover balancer did change the depth of the front engine assembly.




    Here is a close up of the rebuilt roller rockers.



    Also one of the center force clutch after reassembly.



    And after all of the rebuilding and assembly is done it is time for liftoff



    I've had the car back for about two weeks now. I am taking it easy on the shifter for the the next several hundred miles, but ever day it gets better and better. I learned how to tune the Holley 600 and it is kicking out clear exhaust even with the straight pipes. I've got the idle running smooth and steady at 700 RPM's.

    Had the top down yesterday and put over 100 miles on it. The new .110 cam is a joy and the car runs and sounds fantastic. Still has a mean growl from about 2500 to 2900 RPM and settles from 3000 RPM and on. Looking forward to meeting some other Wedges and beating on some more Audi's.
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  6. #16  
    Dave what is a .110 cam? Do you have some other Spec's. 110 would mean it's cut on a 110 Lobe Center, what are the other #'s
    Woody
    The Wedge Shop
    Fast.British.Reliable.
    www.thewedgeshop.com
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  7. #17  
    Little Brit
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26
    It is a Comp Cam with the following numbers;

    Gross valve lift .452 (intake) .457 (exhaust).
    Duration .006 Tappet Lift 256 (open) 268 (close)
    106.0 Intake center line
    Duration @ .050 212 (intake) 219 (exhaust)
    Lobe lift .2830 (intake) .2860 (exhaust)
    Separation 110.0

    I have this explained to me a bit but as you know I am more a driver than a mechanic. The old cam was choppy. This one feels smoother and has two RPM ranges where the engine runs quiet enough to hold a conversation. (1000-2500 and 3200-4000) I am about 300 miles into the 500 mile break in phase so I have not pushed the engine very hard (not above 4000 or overly rapid acceleration), but it delivers the same growl and power as the old cam, just in a tighter range. I will have a better feel when I can fully work the engine.
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