Thread: TR-7 Cylinder Hd Studs

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  1. #1 TR-7 Cylinder Hd Studs 
    Little Brit
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Portsmouth, RI
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    In the "How To" of the Froum section I just posted a couple questions regarding removal of the TR-7 Cylinder Hd studs. Not having much luck so far. Any reply to my questions would be appreciated. Paul C.
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  2. #2  
    Ole Boy
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    Feb 2012
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    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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    410
    Yes, the TR7 cylinder head removal can be brutal! There are special tools made for exactly this purpose, and the TWOA (Triumph Wedge Owners Association) have had one of these made to be used by members. Go check out photos and details on the website http://www.triumphwedgeowners.org under Tech/Parts and then Tool Rentals.
    1979 Triumph TR8 Coupe
    1981 Triumph TR8 Convertible
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  3. #3  
    Little Brit
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    Apr 2012
    Location
    Coral Springs, Florida/ Central Missouri
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    34
    My that looks expensive. I had mine taken off at a shop after I had failed to remove two remaining studs. They told me that they just got underneath it and hit the exhaust manifold with a hammer until the head broke free. Anyway, when you put the studs back in, make sure to use a little bit of anti-seize.
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  4. #4  
    Little Brit
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    Feb 2012
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    Portsmouth, RI
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    Anyone know what the TR-7 Cylinder Hd nuts, bolts and studs are made of. Also anyone know how to read the markings on the cylinder hd bolts of a 1980 TR-7?
    Paul C.
    1980 TR-7 Drop Hd Coupe
    1980 TR-7 Drop Hd Coupe 30th Anniversary Edition
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  5. #5  
    Little Brit
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    Feb 2012
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    Through Google I found a site that explains the markings on British Fasteners. However, they didn't cover the markings on the TR-7 Cylinder Hd bolts. So I submitted a request for an interperation which included a description of the markings on the Cylinder Hd bolts. Interesting enough the style of the hex hd on the bolts according to the site indicates a fine thread. The TR-7 bolts an studs are a course thread. So it will be interesting to see if I get a reply and if they can tell me what the bolts and studs are made from. I've assumed Grade 8 steel which fastener manufacturers recommend for a Grade 8 7/16 x14 lubricated fastener that it be torqued to 52 ft-lbs. The TR-7 manuals say torque to 50 ft-lbs but are silent regarding lubrication of fasteners.
    Paul C.
    1980 TR-7 Drop Hd Coupe
    1980 TR-7 Drop Hd Coupe 30th Anniversary Edition
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  6. #6  
    Little Brit
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    Feb 2012
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    Portsmouth, RI
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    I found that the nuts for the studs are Grade 8 steel and the 50 ft-lbs is for lubricated fasteners. I'm also guessing that the bolts are also Grade 8 and thus the 50 ft-lb limit applies to them when lubricated. But in the end I used the ARP (Automotive Racing Products) cylinder head fastener kit for the TR-7. These are definately high strength fasteners and the kit comes with excellent instructions for installation. I found several sources of the kit on eBay but the ARP site gives a list of dealers many of which are car dealerships.
    Paul C.
    1980 TR-7 Drop Hd Coupe
    1980 TR-7 Drop Hd Coupe 30th Anniversary Edition
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  7. #7  
    Spitfire
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Minnesota, USA
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    I know I'm a little late to this party, but I had a similar bit of trouble getting the head bolts out of my engine.

    I have had the good fortune of having a more experienced "shadetree mechanic" helping me with things, and what he ended up doing was welding the nuts to the tops of the studs (as I am replacing my studs and bolts, so we could "sacrifice" them as needed), and then we used a deep-well 11/16 socket to undo them. A bit unorthodox, but it did the trick.

    Hope this helps anyone else who's having this issue.
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  8. #8  
    Spitfire
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Minnesota, USA
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    I should also note...

    A liberal use of penetrating oil is recommended, as is welding the nut about a half-inch down from the top of the stud.

    Welding on top of the nut would also be advised and allowing it to cool sufficiently before torqueing on it to avoid breaking a stud in the process (learned that one by doing, luckily it didn't snap off in the block!). I'd also keep a fire extinguisher handy... just in case.
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